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Inés López Carrasco (ES) was chosen by the co-organizer Ultima Vez (BE) to take part of the workshop with Martin Kilvady and Chrysha Parkinson at Site, Stockholm (SE)

The workshops focus was on creating your own practice, awareness towards the existence of a questioning practice and the importance of becoming the author of your own process. The spectrum of research issues varied from movement technique and qualities to elements of performative awareness, textures,
imagination, rhythm and tone.

The participants were given a tool to keep working with and applying to their everyday practice. With the aim of opening their own awareness and furthering their fields of research. An insight into another approach to technique and relationship with it. Matin Kilvady and Chrysha Parkinson proposed using technique in dancing may be confused with taking yourself too seriously. What if technique is a tool to help you to reach further than the borders of your own selfimage, rather than something that aims at an aesthetic result?

 

*****
feedback report by Inés López Carrasco

Martin Kilvady and Chrysha Parkisnson´s workshop in Stockholm - September 2010
attended by Inés López Carrasco under the scholarship of Wild Cards/ Jardin d'Europe and Cullberg Ballet

The workshop has been for me a great context for realizing the priority of my interests and ways by
which the practice of those interests gets stimulated. An interest can be approached from different
angles but just from its proximity to my curiosity it is obliged to survive or die out. Therefore even
if the workshop was rich in different kinds of experiences what i get out from it is valuable as far as
i can keep working with it and keep aplying it. The existance of a questionning practice invigorates
the learning process and that's what i have overall enjoyed in this workshop: being given by the
teachers the space to realize my own authority as a dancer. I have not being told what goal i should
be striving for, but rather allowed to be the author of my own process within which to make choices
and to create out of it my own practice.

The teaching of these two experienced performers (each of the teachers with an advanced trayectory
on specific and different practices) is for me a great example of the sharing of research not as a
good ready for consumption but as a tool for opening own and further fields of research. Their
research obbeys to a continuous questionning, a dedication that moves through experience
designing a bulk of information whose shape is ever transforming. It is from this perspective that i
find useful the experience of their classes, as a laboratory for exploration and as a trigger for further
development of the discoveries made.

The spectrum of research issues varied from movement technique and qualities to elements of
performative awareness, textures, imagination, rhythm and tone within the experience of dancing.
One of the aspects that we have dealt with that i take with me from this week's process is the
practice of a disposition towards dancing of being ready, specially since in performing we are
dealing with the strong and constant factor of not knowing. To accept this uncertinty as a space for
trying out and to include a sense of control over the experimentation within that uncertainty is for
me a powerful reminder to apply for dancing and performing.

My understanding of technique has also changed some towards a more fruitful and motivating
relationship with it. I've been making to myself the question of how to put technique at the service
of dancing instead of movement at the service of a technique which often falls into style. The
connotations of technique have been so far for me those of a hard and serious practice. As the
teachers proposed in one of the sessions using technique in the dancing may be confused with
taking yourself too seriously. What if technique is a tool to help you to reach further of the borders
of your self-image, rather than something that aims at an aesthetic result? But if any gesture
conveys an aesthetic, wether intended or not, then technique could be just a condition for the
gesture to happen, and therefore adaptable to necessity of the gesture. Is it technique then just a
sensitivity, an organization anyway present underlying the possibility of movement?

Well, i don't know to what extent all these questions may be actually relevant to the report.
I'd like to finish it by making reference to the warm welcomming i received from Cullberg Ballet.
I've been generously attended by Jane Hopper, the Artistic Co-ordinator of this company, who
assisted me through my stay in the city. She provided me with practical information and updated
me about dance in Sweden which I was so curious to discover, to which added the opportunity to
see two performances in Stockholm that week, one of them at the Dansenhus by invitation of the
company. To her and to the Cullbert Ballet i would like to thank for having been such an open,
attentive and generous host. My gratitude is also to Jardin d'Europe and to Ultima vez for having
chosen my application and providing me with this great opportunity that has enriched and
stimulated to a great extent my experience as a dancer, performer and artist.

Best wishes to all,

Inés López Carrasco

Brussels, 2nd October 2010
 

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